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Issue
Eleven

Recent breakthroughs

Among the Institute's recent achievements was the Life Science Innovation Award at the 2010 Nexxus Annual Life Science Awards, for a new technology developed by Dr Mike Mattey, an Honorary Lecturer in SIPBS. Dr Mattey's work focused on bacteriophage – a virus that “eats” bacteria – and could lead to a better way of fighting and preventing hospital “superbugs” such as MRSA. The treatment, which could also be used in veterinary medicine, food, agriculture, horticulture, decontamination and p…


Recent breakthroughs
Among the Institute's recent achievements was the Life Science Innovation Award at the 2010 Nexxus Annual Life Science Awards, for a new technology developed by Dr Mike Mattey, an Honorary Lecturer in SIPBS. Dr Mattey's work focused on bacteriophage – a virus that “eats” bacteria – and could lead to a better way of fighting and preventing hospital “superbugs” such as MRSA. The treatment, which could also be used in veterinary medicine, food, agriculture, horticulture, decontamination and packaging, has been patented and will be commercialised by a spin-out company called Fixed Phage.  Graeme Boyle, Director of Nexxus, commented: “This innovation is a significant breakthrough in the escalating fight against bacterial disease. Once again, Scottish scientists are at the forefront of world-class scientific developments and our universities are producing potentially world-class companies.”

Dr Gail McConnell of SIPBS also recently won an award worth almost £1 million from the EPSRC for a project designed to improve the resolution of existing laser scanning microscopes, which could lead to important biomedical discoveries. The project will be carried out in the Centre for Biophotonics in SIPBS in conjunction with Professor Gian-Luca Oppo of Strathclyde's Department of Physics.

Researchers in the ROLEST lab have developed a novel high intensity narrow spectrum light (HINS-light) disinfection system for the inactivation of MRSA and other hospital pathogens. Extensive clinical evaluations of the new system, carried out at Glasgow Royal Infirmary, have demonstrated significant reductions in environmental bacterial levels, including MRSA, within sensitive areas of the hospital including isolation rooms in the Burns Unit and Intensive Care Unit. Studies are also exploring the application of HINS-light as a new method to inactivate food-borne pathogens and spoilage microorganisms, including bacterial pathogens belonging to the Listeria, Staphylococcus, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Bacillus and Clostridium groups as well as yeast and mould fungi.
 

"Recent breakthroughs". Science Scotland (Issue Eleven)
Printed from http://www.sciencescotland.org/feature.php?id=125 on 23/06/17 12:58:31 PM

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