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CSE: The Scottish perspective

The fundamental economic, governmental and social infrastructure in society depends on large and complex systems. As hardware and networking capabilities increase, this leads to an increasing demand for greater software capability and integration. It is no longer appropriate to think of these large systems as single entities but as systems of systems whose components are independent entities. …

CSE: The Scottish perspective

Article by Peter Barr

The fundamental economic, governmental and social infrastructure in society depends on large and complex systems. As hardware and networking capabilities increase, this leads to an increasing demand for greater software capability and integration. It is no longer appropriate to think of these large systems as single entities but as systems of systems whose components are independent entities. New systems of systems must be engineered to meet the needs of industry and society, operating robustly within an often hostile external environment. However, the development of such large-scale systems of systems is problematic, as evidenced by continuing reports of software cost over-runs in large scale projects and repeated failures of systems to satisfy the requirements of those who procure and use them. Furthermore, complex systems constantly change, as hardware and software subsystems are modified and updated, and as user requirements and practices shift.  Thus, Complex Systems Engineering (CSE) is a socio-technical as well as a scientific challenge.

The problems of CSE require theoretical and practical research to elaborate new techniques and tools for designing, constructing, modelling, monitoring and reasoning about complex systems, to capture these dynamically changing characteristics. Hence, the research challenges in CSE span a wide range of disciplines from fundamental mathematics, through hierarchies of hardware and software, to educational and organisational change. 

Scotland is already an international leader in Complex Systems Engineering. Areas of excellence include programming languages, heterogeneous systems, parallel, distributed and mobile computing, ubiquitous and pervasive systems, socio-technical systems engineering, and evolutionary- and biologically-inspired computing. There are numerous complementary strengths in these key areas across the SICSA partners, and SICSA's intention is to capitalise and grow such synergies. The SICSA CSE theme is also closely linked to the Next Generation Internet and Modelling and Abstraction themes, and enjoys strong cross-theme interactions. 

 

"CSE: The Scottish perspective". Science Scotland (Issue Ten)
Printed from http://www.sciencescotland.org/feature.php?id=99 on 24/04/17 08:02:27 PM

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